The 500-plus-year-old shark that was born before Shakespeare (VIDEO)

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It is said that a shark that was discovered in the North Atlantic was born around 1505 and it was then that Henry VIII cancelled his engagement with Catherine of Aragon.

The discovered Greenland shark is believed to have existed since before Shakespeare was born.

THE GREENLAND SHARK MAY HAVE BEEN BORN AROUND 1505

The Greenland shark is said to be the oldest living vertebrate ever found and scientists have said it could be as old as 512 years. The shark was caught by a fisherman and was one of 28 sharks the scientists analyzed.

The scientists took the shark’s size into account to determine the year it might have been born and estimated it to be as early as 1505. The Greenland shark species is said to have a growth rate of only 1 cm per year and the species it is known to have a lifespan of many hundreds of years.

The experts who studied the shark measured it at 18 feet long and used radiocarbon dating to put its age between 272 and 512 years old. This particular shark was the oldest of the entire group of sharks that have been analyzed by scientists during this particular study.

MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF THE EYE OF SHARKS TO DETERMINE AGE

Kim Praebel of the Arctic University of Norway said Greenland sharks can live up to 400 years. However, more recent research has suggested that the species may, in fact, be able to live much longer. Thanks to a mathematical model used to analyze the cornea and lens, scientists have been able to predict age and used the method last year to determine the age of an animal.

The Greenland shark is also called the gray or gurry shark and belongs to the Somniosidae family of sharks. Marine biologist Julius Nielsen was among the people who found the sharks and said the creature is extraordinary and is considered one of the oldest animals in the world.

Last year, a shark expert from the University of Iceland said that fishery biologists have tried for many decades to determine the age and life expectancy of Greenland sharks, but without much success. He went on to say that since the shark is the apex predator in Arctic waters, it was unthinkable that they would not realize how long the shark lives. The Greenland species is generally found in the deep-sea Atlantic Ocean from Canada to Norway and frequently feeds on the decomposing carcasses of the polar bear.

Scientists are now sequencing the nuclear genome of the Greenland shark to help them figure out why this particular species lives longer than any other shark species, but is also longer than any other vertebrate.

 

Source: UFOyMisterios