One Hundred Year Old Unbridled Sexual Playboy Released To Galápagos Islands In Ecuador (VIDEO)

Sponsored by: www.criaderodecaracoles.com/category/especies

 

Diego, the giant tortoise who saved his species from extinction thanks to his extraordinary libido, will find freedom on his island of origin in the Galapagos archipelago in March, at the end of the captive breeding program initiated in the 1960s.

The end of the program “provides for the return of the 15 breeding adults”, including Diego, a hundred-year-old male of the Chelonoidis hoodensis species and sire of at least 40% of the young who have since grown up on Española Island, from where he is the native, Galapagos National Park (PNG) announced on Friday.

This unbridled sex-life turtle, which had been repatriated in 1976 from a zoo in the United States, will be released along with twelve females and two other males, with whom the Park conducted this breeding program on the Santa Cruz Island.

Its species now numbers some 2,000 specimens, according to the PNG.

“Almost 1,800 small turtles have been reintroduced to Española Island and now, with natural reproduction, there are around 2,000 turtles,” Jorge Carrion, park manager, told AFP.

This shows that “they are able to grow, reproduce and develop their natural life,” he added.

Diego, taken to the United States in the first half of the 20th century, notably spent thirty years at the San Diego Zoo which gave him his name. He will return to his island of origin “almost eight decades after being extracted from it,” according to the PNG.

This “super stallion” is the opposite of George, the last specimen of the species Chelonoidis abigdoni, who died in 2012 after refusing to breed in captivity.

Carrion said it was “a pleasure to be able to return this turtle to its natural state”.

One Hundred Year Old Unbridled Sexual Playboy Released To Galápagos Islands In Ecuador

Before returning to Española, Diego and his companions will be quarantined to ensure that they do not take seeds of exogenous plants there.

PNG will continue its captive breeding program for four other species from the Floreana, San Cristobal and Isabela islands of the archipelago, located 1000 km from the Ecuadorian coast and classified as a natural heritage of humanity for its unique flora and fauna.

 

Source: TVANouvelles