Video Reveals the Power with which the Tsunami Hit in Indonesia

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The authorities of Indonesia today raised the count to 2,010 of the dead in the earthquake of 7.5 degrees of magnitude and the subsequent tsunami.

The video shows the impact of the first wave of the tsunami on the coast and illustrates the power with which the tsunami struck the central region of the island of Celebes. In the video, gravity from a building, it is seen as people run on a road near the sea in search of shelter seconds before the huge wave rushes with everything in its path.

Indonesian authorities raised the dead by 2,010 in the earthquake of 7.5 magnitudes and the subsequent tsunami that officially left 671 missing but it is feared that there are about 5,000 people under the mud and debris.

The majority of deaths, 1,601, took place in Palu, the capital of the province of Cenlebes Cental and most affected area, said the spokesman of the National Agency for Disaster Management, Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, at a press conference. The rest occurred in the municipalities of Sigi (222), Donggala (171), Parigi Moutong (15), all of them in Central Sulawesi, and one in the province of West Celebes, said the spokesman.

Sutopo placed the number of injured in 10,679, 2,549 of them serious, and the displaced in 82,775 sheltered in more than a hundred shelters.

In Palu, where about 350,000 people lived before the tragedy, 8,276 people have left the city

Authorities have buried nearly half of the deceased in mass graves, while the other half have been buried by their families.

In Palu, where about 350,000 people lived before the tragedy, 8,276 people have left the city, mostly through its airport that operates normally but with 200 meters less of the track.

Meanwhile, the search and rescue efforts, which will continue until Thursday, focus on rescuing the bodies under the rubble and mud in the most affected areas such as the Balaroa neighbourhood and the Petobo village, both in Palu and the Jono Oge village., in Sigi.

 

Source: La Vanguardia