The Strange Story of a Spanish Monk Who Was a Pirate

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Tiburcio de Redín was ombrado by King Caballero de Santiago, served under the orders of one of the most distinguished sailors in Spain. Until one day he came to his senses and decided to put an end to the excesses of the past by taking capuchin habits.

If it were true that the buildings conserve part of the energy of their former inhabitants, the students of the Pamplona Music Conservatory would be in luck. And is that between its walls were born two of the most illustrious men that Navarra has given to Spain: Martín and Tiburcio de Redín. The first would become Viceroy of Sicily and Grand Master of the Order of Malta, under the reign of Philip IV. Tiburcio’s thing, on the other hand, is another song.

Barely fourteen years old, Tiburcio enrolled in the Old Infantry Tercios, where his bravery in the Italian campaign would initially confer him the rank of lieutenant and shortly thereafter, that of sea captain and war. Possibly, he came to be in command of one of the most famous Spanish galleons in history, the Nuestra Señora de Atocha, which covered the route with the New World. When the treasure hunter Mel Fisher discovered his remains in 1985, he took a loot that exceeded 400 million dollars. It could have been more since, when setting sail, the Spanish galleon carried in its warehouses a recognized cargo – there was always some contraband on board – of more than 24 tons of silver and gold; Such a transfer could only be guarded by people as trustworthy as they were to fear. With Tiburcio Redín, both requirements were fulfilled.

Appointed by King Caballero de Santiago, he served under the command of one of the most distinguished sailors in Spain, Antonio de Oquendo, in whose company he would be wounded more than once and gain a very useful combat experience. On one occasion, he learned that a Dutch corsair ship was waiting for him to leave port to board him, so he devised a stratagem that still astonishes today.

The Strange Story of a Spanish Monk Who Was a Pirate

He loaded his ship with stones, so that it seemed to go to the gold bars and disabled his artillery pieces. At the same time, he doubled the crew of his ship with heavily armed Spanish infantrymen, ordering them to appear scared and unarmed. That made the Dutch not hesitate when it came to boarding the Spanish galleon. Big mistake. When the pirate captain was about to enter the cabin of his Spanish counterpart – he had climbed aboard the ship without any resistance – presumably ill, he unleashed a shot between his eyebrows that served as a signal for the Spanish infantrymen to take the plunge of the surprised Dutch ship.

Fusta in hand, he began to beat with the terrified soldiers who, seeing the barrage of blows that were coming on them, put feet in dust. A whole character, the Redin

The few pirates that remained in the Spanish galleon, now almost empty when the tables were turned, decided to shoot their own ship, not to mention that Captain Redín had previously disabled the cannons. They had no choice but to surrender. Thus, the Spanish sailor was made with a valuable capture, which earned him to solve their “little problems” with justice, since our man was always fighting in duel for game issues and skirts.

Until one day he came to his senses and decided to put an end to the excesses of the past by taking capuchin habits . But his fate would haunt him even away from the madding crowd. During a voyage through North Africa, the ship he was on was attacked by a Dutch vessel. Knowing the past of the friar, the Spanish captain asked Redín to take charge of the situation, but he refused saying that was no longer his thing. However, his superior urged him to act “to preserve the faith” … said and done. Redín, sword in hand, took control of the ship and in a jiffy he fled to the Dutch .

All in all, this would not be the last achievement of the Navarrese aristocrat, who became a friar. On the way to Tudela, he stopped at a tavern where a group of soldiers tried to force the waitress. Redín reproached them but they, seeing before him a poor capuchin, challenged him to prevent him. And boy, did he stop it? Fusta in hand, he began to beat with the terrified soldiers who, seeing the barrage of blows that were coming on them, put feet in dust. A whole character, this Redín. And cook before friar; yes, weapons take.

 

Source: Actuall